Lahaina Banyan Court

Lahaina Banyan Tree Park – See How the Oldest Banyan Tree in Maui Spreads Across the Park
Local Expert's Rating:
4 / 5
The Bottom Line:

Lahaina Banyan Tree Park serves as an excellent spot to kick back and relax after a day of exploring Maui. A 150-year-old banyan tree magnificently sprawls across the space, while the old Lahaina Courthouse sits nearby. Interesting community events land here year-round, letting you work even more fun into your day.

- The HawaiianIslands.com Local Expert Team

Lahaina Banyan Tree Park offers a glimpse into the history and culture of the region while serving as a great place to get away from it all. Time seems to slow down a bit as you step into this green space, despite its location right by all the action along the waterfront. Even with the restaurants, shops, and activities all around, the park has a quiet aesthetic all its own.

Setting the tone is the massive 150-year-old banyan tree that stretches across the park. Despite standing separate dozens of feet apart, every last one of the trees in this park comes from the original. The banyan tree has an interesting way of growing, after all, stretching its roots down from the trunk to create more of its kind.

At one time, the park only had a single original tree, which came from India in April of 1873. At just eight feet tall, this tree didn’t even hint at its magnificence to come. Through the years, the original tree grew to over 60 feet tall and created over a dozen new trunks across the greenspace. The canopies over each trunk interlace above to create over 2/3rds of an acre of shade.

Although the tree is a true sight to behold all on its own, it is not the only thing bringing people to this park. The old Lahaina Courthouse and harbor just across the street are well worth a look as well. The courthouse opened in 1860 for use as a government building for court matters, customs, and more. Since then, the first floor has transformed into a visitor center, gift shop, and art gallery full of local works. If you go upstairs, there’s a museum filled with amazing exhibits showcasing the history of the region.

Swing by to:

Take Photos with the Famed Tree
There’s perhaps nothing more magical than striking a pose and getting your photo with the famed banyan tree. If you watch your angles, you can even make it look like you’re visiting a remote forest rather than a park in the middle of the city. If you’re lucky, the wild chickens might even pop in the frame and perfectly complete your scene. 

Explore the Old Lahaina Courthouse 
If you want to go on a deep dive into Lahaina history and culture, you definitely need to make time to visit the courthouse. Admission is free for the museum and art gallery, so plan to spend at least an hour exploring inside. Don’t forget to jet on over to the harbor as well to gaze upon the beauty of the Pacific Ocean.

Watch Arts and Crafts Demonstrations
Art in the Park always livens up the place, giving everyone a glimpse into the works made by local artists. Occurring every second and four weekends each month, this fun event features arts and craft demonstrations, artwork sales, and so much more. There are many other community events held here year-round, too, so check in often to see what’s going down.

Parking can prove challenging, especially on the weekends. There’s no dedicated lot, so you’ll have to park on the street. If you don’t mind walking, there’s a free public parking lot at Front Street and Prison Street. You’re welcome to park there for hours upon hours, making it easy to visit all the nearby restaurants and boutique as well.

Insider Tips:
-The houseless population often spends their daytime hours in this park. On rainy days, they use the trees for shelter. Otherwise, they usually take up quite a few of the benches.
-No matter where you park, never leave valuables in your vehicle. Even leaving items in the trunk is ill advised, especially if you’ll be kicking around town for most of the day.
-Look for the placards all through the park that share the history of the banyan tree along with the land and its people.